It’s All in the Ending…

Blackbird.pngJust when you thought you had it figured out right?

A recent review of over 350,000 email threads by Boomerang found that some email closings resulted in much higher response rates.

We all know that the end of an email is dependent on the content and context of the email. So for example, if you’re writing a business email, as I do regularly, you may end with “Best Regards,” “Sincerely” or “Best Wishes.” If you wrote to mom or dad or spouse, your closing line may be “Love,” “Miss you”  or “Hugs and Kisses.”

Most popular closings based on the sample of emails reviewed included the following: 

  1. Thanks
  2. Regards
  3. Cheers
  4. Best regards
  5. Thanks in advance
  6. Thank you
  7. Best
  8. Kind regards

Interestingly enough, emails that ended with some level of gratitude or expression of appreciation received significantly higher responses than emails with other types of closings. 

For examples, “Thanks in advance” resulted in a 65.7 percent response rate, where as “best” resulted in a 51.2 percent response rate.

Email Closing Response Rate
thanks in advance 65.7%
thanks 63.0%
thank you 57.9%
cheers 54.4%
kind regards 53.9%
regards 53.5%
best regards 52.9%
best 51.2%
Baseline (all emails in sample) 47.5%

Source: blog.boomerang.com

When comparing emails with “thankful closings” to all others, Boomerang’s research noted a response rate of 62 percent. The response rate for emails without a closing of gratitude had a response rate of 46 percent.

“Closing with an expression of gratitude thus correlated with a whopping 36% relative increase in average response rate compared to signing off another way.” – Boomerang

I’ve ended emails a variety of ways, though when I’m being formal, I tend to stick to “Best Regards,” but this article has provided some food for thought on how important it is to express gratitude in email, if nothing else, to ensure someone writes back.

On a separate topic, Chicago Manual of Style has new updates:

  • Internet will be lowercase
  • Email will lose the hyphen.

They’re a little late to the game, but the world rejoices.